Hypocrisy at its best

Yesterday when we called our farmer to see if we could pick up some milk, we were told that they’re not going to be selling raw milk anymore. I was pretty upset for the first half of the day because we have grown to depend on this farmer and his milk every week for the past 2 years. While stewing over all the possible reasons including threats from state agencies, I just got mad. We supposedly live in a “free” country. We can buy cigarettes that are KNOWN to cause cancer, parents can drive around smoking in the car with the windows rolled up with the kids in the backseat. You can feed you kids high fructose corn syrup in the form of a soda pop with every meal if you want to. But, in many states in this country, you can’t buy raw milk. This is so silly to me. In Oklahoma, you are allowed buy raw milk if you travel to the farm and buy it. I’m thankful for this, but how silly is it that a farmer can get in trouble for meeting someone halfway and selling them milk that they are willingly buying? What kind of country do we live in that I can’t buy my family something that is GREAT for them, yet we have toys covered in lead paint, food additives, and pesticide covered produce that you can pick up at your local Wal-mart? Before you freak out and wonder, “Why would anyone subject their family to the dangers of raw milk?” Read up on it. Don't form an opinion until you have actually done a little research.
Books:
Real Food: What to Eat and Why


The Raw Milk Revolution: Behind America's Emerging Battle Over Food Rights

Websites:
A Campaign For Real Milk
Weston A. Price Foundation
http://www.raw-milk-facts.com/

I want to thank our farmer for his dedication these past two years, for milking his cows twice daily, providing them with humane and sanitary conditions, feeding them the grass-fed diet that their body was made for, and risking his livelihood so that we could buy healthy milk for our family. Our bodies thank you.

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